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An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts by Joseph W. Koterski

By Joseph W. Koterski

By means of exploring the philosophical personality of a few of the best medieval thinkers, An advent to Medieval Philosophy presents a wealthy assessment of philosophy on the earth of Latin Christianity.

  • Explores the deeply philosophical personality of such medieval thinkers as Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham
  • Reviews the crucial beneficial properties of the epistemological and metaphysical challenge of universals
  • Shows how medieval authors tailored philosophical rules from antiquity to use to their spiritual commitments
  • Takes a large philosophical technique of the medieval period by,taking account of classical metaphysics, basic tradition, and non secular themes

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An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts

By means of exploring the philosophical personality of a few of the best medieval thinkers, An creation to Medieval Philosophy presents a wealthy evaluate of philosophy on the planet of Latin Christianity. Explores the deeply philosophical personality of such medieval thinkers as Augustine, Boethius, Eriugena, Anselm, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus, and Ockham experiences the vital good points of the epistemological and metaphysical challenge of universals exhibits how medieval authors tailored philosophical principles from antiquity to use to their spiritual commitments Takes a huge philosophical method of the medieval period by,taking account of classical metaphysics, basic tradition, and spiritual subject matters

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For all of the spiritual writing done during the Middle Ages, there was no separate discipline called theology for much of that period. If anything, authors preferred to speak of the philosophia Christi (“the philosophy of Christ”). 20 Even the term “theology,” for instance, is a somewhat alien term for Augustine. 21 The philosophical arguments typical of natural theology provided material that could find a place within Christian thought, but Augustine takes it as unlikely that they will have as much prominence among adherents of revealed wisdom as they did for pagan philosophers.

The connotations of the word “fool” here could cause his point to be misunderstood. Although the sentence in question clearly implies a warning about the misconduct that one might be tempted to justify on the basis of denying God’s existence, there is nothing of condescension or contempt in Anselm’s use of the term “fool” within his philosophical treatment of the question about the existence of God. Quite the opposite: Anselm’s argument (discussed in its own right in the chapter below on God) uses for its starting point the case of a person who denies the existence of God in order to show the need for sound reasoning about this most important of topics.

In this respect Anselm is following closely on Augustine’s lead. 23, in Augustine (1990). 20 See Wilken (2003). 5, in Augustine (1984). See Gerson (1990), pp. 1–5. 22 See Gilson (1969). 23 In chapter 5 on the transcendentals, I discuss in further detail the commitment found throughout the Middle Ages to the thesis that all beings as beings are good, in the sense of possessing various inherent perfections that can be the object of desire of a being with appetitive drives. As a philosophical position, the doctrine of transcendental goodness reaches back at least as far as Plato’s Republic.

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